Germany set to strip Gerhard Schröder of office space — but he can keep €8K allowance

BERLIN — Germany’s governing coalition wants to strip Gerhard Schröder of his office rooms in Berlin to punish the former chancellor for his ongoing personal and business ties to Russian President Vladimir Putin.

According to tabloid Bild, the coalition consisting of the Social Democrats (SPD), which Schröder is still a member of, the Greens and the liberal Free Democrats (FDP) wants to make the final decision Thursday during a session of the budget committee.

While Schröder is to keep his ex-chancellor’s allowance of €8,300 per month, six rooms in a building across the street from the Russian Embassy located on Berlin’s prestigious Unter den Linden boulevard will be taken away, the newspaper wrote, saving German taxpayers €407,000 annually.

A spokesperson for Schröder was not immediately available for comment.

The former chancellor has been under fire for his refusal to properly condemn Russia for invading Ukraine or cut his business ties to Russian energy giant Gazprom. His staff quit en masse at the start of March.

And last month, Schröder, who served as German chancellor from 1998 until 2005, told the New York Times in an interview that he doesn’t “do mea culpa,” sticking to his long-term position on Russia.